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Chest. 1996 Mar;109(3):673-9.

Sleep, breathing, and cephalometrics in older children and young adults. Part II -- Response to nasal occlusion.

Author information

1
Sleep and Chronobiology Research Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, E.P. Bradley Hospital/Brown University, East Providence, RI 02915, USA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

We postulated that nasal occlusion would provide a challenge enabling us to assess factors predisposing development of sleep apnea in older children/adolescents and young adults. Factors of interest included sex, age, body mass index (BMI), tonsillar hypertrophy, and cephalometric measurements.

DESIGN:

Sleep and breathing variables were examined and compared for four groups of subjects between one baseline night and one night of nasal occlusion in a sleep research laboratory.

SUBJECTS:

Healthy, normal boys (n=23, mean age=13.3+/-2.1 years), girls (n=22, mean age=13.8+/-1.8 years), men (n=23, mean age=22.2+/-1.5 years), and women (n=24, mean age=22.4+/-1.8 years) were studied.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

The following sleep and sleep-related breathing measures showed significant increases in all four groups from baseline to occlusion: percentage of stage 1, number of transient arousals, transient arousal index, apnea index, respiratory disturbance index (RDI), and mean apnea length. No significant relationships were found between occlusion-night RDI and tonsillar size, cephalometric variables, or BMI, either singly or in combination.

CONCLUSIONS:

Subjects' responses to nasal occlusion varied: most demonstrated a minimal and clinically insignificant increase in RDI; few showed a marked increase in RDI. Significant increases of sleep fragmentation -- even in the absence of frankly disturbed breathing -- indicate that nasal occlusion may secondarily affect waking function if prolonged over a series of nights.

PMID:
8617075
DOI:
10.1378/chest.109.3.673
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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