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J Clin Invest. 1996 Feb 15;97(4):1010-9.

Specific genetic deficiencies of the A and B isoenzymes of monoamine oxidase are characterized by distinct neurochemical and clinical phenotypes.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, St. Radboud University Hospital, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Monoamine oxidase (MAO) exists as two isoenzymes and plays a central role in the metabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters. In this study we compared the neurochemical phenotypes of previously described subjects with genetically determined selective lack of MAO-A or a lack of both MAO-A and MAO-B with those of two subjects with a previously described X chromosome microdeletion in whom we now demonstrate selective MAO-B deficiency. Mapping of the distal deletion breakpoint demonstrates its location in intron 5 of the MAO-B gene, with the deletion extending proximally into the Norrie disease gene. In contrast to the borderline mental retardation and abnormal behavioral phenotype in subjects with selective MAO-A deficiency and the severe mental retardation in patients with combined MAO-A/MAO-B deficiency and Norrie disease, the MAO-B-deficient subjects exhibit neither abnormal behavior nor mental retardation. Distinct neurochemical profiles characterize the three groups of MAO-deficient patients. In MAO-A-deficient subjects, there is a marked decrease in deaminated catecholamine metabolites and a concomitant marked elevation of O-methylated amine metabolites. These neurochemical changes are only slightly exaggerated in patients with combined lack of MAO-A and MAO-B. In contrast, the only biochemical abnormalities detected in subjects with the MAO-B gene deletion are a complete absence of platelet MAO-B activity and an increased urinary excretion of phenylethylamine. The differences in neurochemical profiles indicate that, under normal conditions, MAO-A is considerably more important than MAO-B in the metabolism of biogenic amines, a factor likely to contribute to the different clinical phenotypes.

PMID:
8613523
PMCID:
PMC507147
DOI:
10.1172/JCI118492
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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