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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1996 Apr;77(4):356-62.

Deficiencies in standing weight shifts by ambulant hemiplegic subjects.

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  • 1Department of Human Movement Studies, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare weight shifts of hemiplegic subjects with controls in parallel and diagonal stance.

DESIGN:

Case-control study.

SETTING:

All subjects were functionally independent in the general community. Hemiplegic subjects had qualified for and had received rehabilitation.

PARTICIPANTS:

Independently ambulant hemiplegic subjects, who exhibited an asymmetrical gait pattern, were compared with age-and sex-matched controls recruited from the same community.

INTERVENTIONS:

Subjects maintained a series of weight shift postures, each for a duration of 10sec, while standing on a transduced platform with feet both parallel and placed diagonally, the latter position designed to mimic the double support phases of the gait cycle.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Locations of center of pressure (CP) were measured in relation to each subject's center of base of support and, ranges of weight shift in each direction were calculated.

RESULTS:

With feet parallel, the hemiplegic sample was deficient in shifting weight towards the hemiplegic leg and posteriorly (p<.05). The diagonal tests revealed deficiencies in shifting weight posterolaterally over both lower limbs (p<.05) but particularly over the affected leg. The ranges over which weight could be significantly below the values for the normal sample in both cardinal plane and diagonal directions (P<.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Even functionally ambulant hemiplegic subjects demonstrate marked limitations in the capacity to shift weight and possess a reduced range of weight shift. The diagonal tests emphasized deficiencies in shifting weight posteriorly over both limbs and toward the affected side, specific rehabilitation of which may improve gait.

PMID:
8607759
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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