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Obstet Gynecol. 1996 Apr;87(4):621-6.

A randomized controlled trial of smoking cessation intervention in pregnancy in an academic clinic.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, USA.

Abstract

To evaluate the effectiveness of a physician-based intervention to promote smoking cessation during pregnancy, we conducted this randomized controlled trial in the resident-staffed prenatal clinics at the University of North Carolina Women's Hospital . Two hundred fifty prenatal patients who smoked were enrolled at their first visit and randomly assigned to the intervention or the usual-care group. Resident physicians provided self-help materials to intervention subjects and used a script to set goals with them at each prenatal visit. Subjects who set quit dates were contacted by volunteer cessation counselors. To verify smoking status, subjects provided a self-report and breath carbon monoxide (CO) sample at each visit. Controls were similarly assessed at enrollment and at three additional predetermined intervals. Twenty percent of intervention subjects and 10% of controls reported cessation, which was verified by CO level (P = .052). Fifty-one percent of subjects reduced their consumption by half or more, compared with 30% of controls (P = .002). The intervention is effective in promoting smoking cessation and reduction. In addition, this technique is inexpensive, readily accepted by staff, and efficient.

PMID:
8602320
DOI:
10.1016/0029-7844(95)00492-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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