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Obstet Gynecol. 1996 Apr;87(4):610-2.

Central hemodynamic effects of recombinant human relaxin in the isolated, perfused rat heart model.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Penn State University, College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the cardiac effects of relaxin in the isolated, perfused rat heart model, and to see if pregnancy modifies the hormone's actions.

METHODS:

Hearts were excised from 18 female Sprague-Dawley rats (ten pregnant, eight nonpregnant) and attached to a Langendorff apparatus. Left ventricular systolic pressure, heart rate, and contractility were measured. Hearts were exposed serially to 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 8.0, and 16.0 ng/mL concentrations of recombinant human relaxin.

RESULTS:

Hearts from pregnant rats had lower heart rates than those from nonpregnant animals. Relaxin increased heart rate, left ventricular systolic pressure, and contractility in a dose-dependent fashion. Pregnancy did not modify this response.

CONCLUSION:

Recombinant human relaxin is a potent inotropic and chronotropic agent. The effects coupled with the physiologic increase of relaxin during human pregnancy indicate that relaxin may be involved in the cardiovascular changes of pregnancy.

PMID:
8602317
DOI:
10.1016/0029-7844(95)00493-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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