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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1996 Mar;77(3):265-8.

Reliability of isokinetic measurements of ankle dorsal and plantar flexors in normal subjects and in patients with peripheral neuropathy.

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1
Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To establish a reliable method for evaluation of motor performance of ankle dorsal and plantar flexors in healthy subjects and in patients with peripheral neuropathy.

DESIGN:

Thirty-eight control subjects and 7 patients with peripheral neuropathy were studied. All patients and 25 control subjects were test twice.

PATIENTS AND CONTROL SUBJECTS:

An outdoor clinic sample of 7 patients with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy (HMSN) and 38 control subjects.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The effect of a rest interval, a displacement of the axis of rotation, examination by three investigators on the peak torque and work of dorsal and plantar flexors, and the percentage difference at test-retests.

RESULTS:

Control subjects had percentage differences of 5.6% and 8.0% for dorsal flexion and 3.8% and 8.7% for plantar flexion at 60 degrees/sec and 180 degrees/sec, respectively. In neuropathic patients the percentage differences were 0% and 8.6% for dorsal and 5.1% and 12.3% for plantar flexion at 30 degrees/sec and 60 degrees/sec, respectively. No interindividual differences between 3 investigators were found. A rest interval between trials resulted in an increased plantar flexion peak torque (P < .05). Displacement of 1.5cm of the axis of rotation resulted in a change of the peak torque of 8.3% for plantar flexion (P < .01).

CONCLUSIONS:

A well-defined test protocol for isokinetic motor performance of the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors provides a reliable procedure for quantification of motor function in healthy subjects and in patients with HMSN1.

PMID:
8600869
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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