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Free Radic Biol Med. 1995 Dec;19(6):911-8.

Depleted mucosal antioxidant defences in inflammatory bowel disease.

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1
Division of Clinical Science, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, A.C.T., Australia.

Abstract

Experimental approaches designed to define the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by inflammatory cells in the tissue injury seen in inflammatory bowel disease rarely consider the chemical antioxidant defences against such increased oxidant stress in the mucosa. In this investigation, we have analysed components of the aqueous and lipid phase antioxidant mucosal defences by measuring the total peroxyl radical scavenging capacity and the levels of urate, glutathione, alpha-tocopherol, and ubiquinol-10 in paired noninflamed and inflamed mucosal biopsies from inflammatory bowel disease patients. Compared to paired noninflamed mucosa, decreases were observed in inflamed mucosa for total peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (55%, p = 0.0031), urate [Crohn's disease (CD), 62.2%, p = 0.066; ulcerative colitis (UC), 47.3%, p = 0.031], glutathione (UC, 59%, 7/8 patients, ns), total glutathione (UC 65.2%, 6/8 patients, ns), ubiquinol-10 (CD, 75.7%, p = 0.03; UC, 90.5%, p = 0.005). The mean alpha-tocopherol content was unchanged. These observations support our earlier findings of decreased reduced and total ascorbic acid in inflamed IBD mucosa and demonstrate that the loss of chemical antioxidant defences affects almost all the major components. The decreased antioxidant defences may severely compromise the inflamed mucosa, rendering it more susceptible to oxidative tissue damage, hindering recovery of the mucosa and return of epithelial cell layer integrity. The loss of chemical antioxidant components provides a strong rational for developing novel antioxidant therapies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

PMID:
8582668
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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