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Am J Pathol. 1996 Feb;148(2):623-30.

Correlation between clinicopathological features and karyotype in lipomatous tumors. A report of 178 cases from the Chromosomes and Morphology (CHAMP) Collaborative Study Group.

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1
St. Thomas's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Soft tissue tumors commonly show cytogenetic abnormalities, some of which are tumor specific. Lipomatous tumors represent the largest category of soft tissue neoplasms, and numerous karyotypic aberrations have been identified. However, clear-cut correlation between morphology and karyotype has not been undertaken on a systematic basis in a double-blind setting. The morphological features and histological diagnosis of 178 lipomatous neoplasms were reviewed independently without knowledge of the clinical data. The consensus diagnoses were then correlated with the clinical findings and compared with the tumors' karyotypes, using G-banded preparations from short-term cultures. The data were collated by a multicenter collaborative group of pathologists, geneticists, and surgeons. Clonal chromosomal abnormalities were identified in 149 cases studied (84%) and, to a large extent, the karyotype correlated with the morphological diagnosis. Specifically, 26 (96%) of 27 myxoid liposarcomas and its poorly differentiated variants showed a t(12;16); 29 (78%) of 37 atypical lipomatous tumors (including 5 dedifferentiated cases) showed ring chromosomes; 74 (80%) of 93 subcutaneous and intramuscular lipomas had karyotypic aberrations affecting mainly 12q, 6p, and 13q; 7 of 8 spindle cell and pleomorphic lipomas had aberrations of 16q; 3 lipoblastomas showed 8q rearrangements; and 2 hibernomas showed 11q abnormalities. We conclude that cytogenetic abnormalities are common in lipomatous tumors, correlate reliably with morphological sub-type in many cases, and can be of diagnostic value in histologically borderline or difficult cases.

PMID:
8579124
PMCID:
PMC1861666
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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