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Int J Sports Med. 1995 Oct;16(7):421-7.

The effect of oral coenzyme Q10 on the exercise tolerance of middle-aged, untrained men.

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1
Wright State University, Department of Orthopedics, Dayton, OH 45509, USA.

Abstract

In order to determine the effect of oral Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) dosing on exercise capacity, 15 middle-aged men (44.7 +/- 2.0 years) received either CoQ10 (150 mg/day x 2 months-Q10 GRP) or placebo (2 months-CON GRP). Blood CoQ10 levels increased (p < 0.05) during the treatment in the Q10 GRP (Pre = 0.72 +/- 0.06, 2 months = 1.08 +/- 0.14 micrograms/ml) and were unchanged in the CON GRP (Pre = 0.91 +/- 0.05, 2 month = 0.69 +/- 0.05 microgram/ml). Similarly, the subjective perception of vigor (visual analog scale 1-10 where, 10 = very energetic, and 0 = very, very unenergetic) increased (p < 0.05) in the Q10 GRP (Pre = 5.73 +/- 0.35, 2 month = 6.64 +/- 0.45). However, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max Pre = 2.97 +/- 0.18, 2 month = 3.05 +/- 0.15 l/min) and lactate threshold (LT Pre = 2.04 +/- 0.12, 2 month = 2.08 +/- 0.12 l/min), as measured on the cycle ergometer, were unchanged as a result of the CoQ10 treatment, Neither forearm oxygen uptake, nor forearm blood flow was found to be affected by the CoQ10. Although lactate release during hand-grip testing tended to decrease in the Q10 GRP (Pre = 227 +/- 49, 2 month = 168.3 +/- 40 mumole/min) this was not significant (p > 0.05). It can be concluded that short-term (2 months) oral dosing with CoQ10 increases circulating blood levels of CoQ10 and the subjective perceived level of vigor in middle-aged men. However, short-term dosing does not improve aerobic capacity or firearm exercise metabolism as measured in this investigation.

PMID:
8550248
DOI:
10.1055/s-2007-973031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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