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Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1995 Nov;102(11):882-7.

Effect of preterm premature rupture of membranes on neurodevelopmental outcome: follow up at two years of age.

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1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Mondino, Pavia, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the impact of preterm premature rupture of membranes on the neurodevelopmental outcome of infants, assessed at two years of age.

DESIGN:

A prospective observational study of surviving preterm infants born after premature rupture of membranes and of infants born after spontaneous preterm labour with intact membranes. The study was carried out in the period 1986 to 1991.

SETTING:

Pavia, Italy.

SUBJECTS:

One hundred and forty singleton infants born prematurely after premature rupture of membranes between 24 and 34 weeks of gestation and 120 controls of similar gestational age born after spontaneous preterm labour with intact membranes.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Infant neurodevelopmental outcome at two-year follow up.

RESULTS:

After adjustment, by logistic analysis for the effect of gestational age and birthweight, infants born after premature rupture of membranes were more likely to have severe neurodevelopmental impairment (spastic tetraplegia and/or Bayley mental developmental index < 71) than controls (adjusted OR 5.75, 95% CI 1.22-27.18). Multivariate analysis of linear trend showed a statistically significant relation of duration of membrane rupture to occurrence of severe intraventricular haemorrhage, cystic periventricular leucomalacia and moderate to severe infant neurodevelopmental impairment.

CONCLUSION:

Infants born after prolonged premature rupture of membranes are at higher risk of subsequent moderate to severe neurodevelopmental impairment than those born after spontaneous labour with intact membranes.

PMID:
8534623
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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