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Ophthalmology. 1993 May;100(5):724-9.

Endophthalmitis caused by the coagulase-negative staphylococci. 2. Factors influencing presentation after cataract surgery.

Author information

1
Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard University Medical School, Boston, MA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study, comprising 60 patients with coagulase-negative staphylococcal endophthalmitis which occurred after cataract surgery, was designed to define the variation in disease presentation and visual outcome and to evaluate statistically the role of the primary surgery and its management.

METHODS:

An intensive evaluation of microbiological, inpatient, outpatient, and cataract surgery charts was made retrospectively using a standardized protocol. The predictive value of surgical, iatrogenic, and clinical factors was analyzed for their influence on defined aspects of the disease pattern and of the visual results using multiple regression models, via a stepwise technique.

RESULTS:

There was commonly a significant asymptomatic latent period after cataract surgery. The median diagnostic delay was 7 days; 22% of patients presented after 2 weeks and 12% after 1 month. Symptoms progressed longer than 3 days in 25% of patients. Ten percent had no pain. Clinical variation proved largely unrelated to cataract surgery events and postoperative management; bacterial factors were implicated. Good visual outcome was associated statistically with intensive topical corticosteroid in the symptomatic period, but was negatively associated with operative subconjunctival corticosteroid.

CONCLUSIONS:

The clinical variation in cases of postoperative coagulase-negative staphylococcal endophthalmitis poses particular problems for diagnosis in the outpatient setting. Surgical and perioperative events (except corticosteroid use) probably can be disregarded in studies of endophthalmitis management.

PMID:
8493016
DOI:
10.1016/s0161-6420(93)31583-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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