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Rev Invest Clin. 1993 Jan-Feb;45(1):13-21.

[Obesity as a cardiovascular risk factor in Mexico. Study in an open population].

[Article in Spanish]

Author information

1
Centro de Estudios en Diabetes, American British Cowdray Hospital, México, D.F.

Abstract

We present the results of a population based study designed to estimate the prevalence of obesity defined as body mass index (BMI males > or = 27.7 kg/m and females > or = 27.31 kg/m) and to characterize the adipose tissue distribution pattern in our population, using subscapular and triceps skinfolds and waist and hip circumferences. In addition we assess the effect of obesity on the various metabolic indices that define cardiovascular risk, and explore the attitude of the participants towards obesity and its health consequences. The survey was performed in a low income neighborhood of Mexico City. Anthropometric measurements, laboratory determinations and protocol procedures used in the study were all performed according to international recommendations. The community had 4411 inhabitants, of whom 931 were age eligible (35-64 years): 452 (48.5%) men, 479 (51.5%) women. The response rate for the home interview was 91.7% and for the physical examination with interview and laboratory determinations it was 69.9%. The crude prevalence of obesity in men was 36.8% and in women 60.0%. Subscapular and triceps skinfold measurements were significantly higher in obese patients when compared to non obese participants. Adiposity tended to be distributed preferentially in the lower segment of the body, both in males and females. This pattern showed a tendency to reverse in the obese population. Fat distribution also showed a centrally predominant pattern, especially in obese males. In patients with obesity systemic blood pressure was higher than without obesity, though this was significant only in the first two age groups in males and the youngest age group in females.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
8484063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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