Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Brain Res. 1993 Apr 2;607(1-2):167-76.

Retinal afferents innervate functionally tectal but not neocortical grafts placed in lesioned superior colliculus of adult rats.

Author information

1
N.K. Kolzov Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow.

Abstract

Solid pieces of tectum or occipital neocortex derived from 17-day rat fetuses were placed over the lesioned right superior colliculus (SC) in adult rats as sheets retaining the internal structure of the embryonal tissue. The upper laminae of the recipient's SC (approximately up to stratum opticum) were removed by aspiration after the neocortex overlying the SC was aspirated out. Two to 5 months after the operation a microelectrode study of the neuronal electrical activity in the grafts was performed. Recordings from the tectal transplants revealed normal patterns of the spontaneous neuronal activity in all grafts and clear neuronal reactions to visual stimuli in a large portion of them (6 out of 11). Visual reactions in these grafts were recorded from the majority of studied neurons (185/226). The properties of the receptive fields as well as the range of latencies of the reactions corresponded to those characteristic of the normal SC. Topographic representation of the visual field upon the transplants was found. Recordings from the cortical grafts showed an abnormal character of the spontaneous neuronal activity and the absence of reactions to any sensory stimulation of the recipients. The data obtained suggest that regenerating optic axons in adult hosts retain specificity in functional innervation of only appropriate target neurons and can re-establish the topographic representation of the retina upon tectal grafts. Retinal afferents innervate functionally tectal but not neocortical grafts placed in lesioned superior colliculus of adult rats.

PMID:
8481793
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center