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AIDS. 1993 Feb;7(2):183-8.

HIV wasting syndrome in the United States.

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1
Division of HIV/AIDS, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia 30333.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the characteristics of individuals > or = 13 years of age with HIV wasting syndrome in the United States and US territories.

DESIGN:

Retrospective review of national AIDS case surveillance data.

METHODS:

Data for the 147,225 individuals with AIDS reported to the Centers for Disease Control from 1 September 1987 to 31 August 1991 were reviewed. The frequency of HIV wasting syndrome and its association with demographic and exposure category variables and with other AIDS-indicator diseases were assessed.

RESULTS:

A total of 10,525 (7.1%) had wasting syndrome as the only AIDS-indicator condition, and 15,726 (10.7%) had wasting syndrome plus at least one other AIDS-indicator condition. Patients with wasting syndrome as the only AIDS diagnosis were more likely to be female, to be black or Hispanic, and to have a mode of HIV exposure reported as injecting drug use, heterosexual contact, or transfusion/hemophilia. The proportion of AIDS patients reported with wasting syndrome varied by geographic distribution, ranging from 11% in the northeastern United States to 47% in Puerto Rico. The association between HIV wasting syndrome and Hispanic ethnicity was due to the much higher prevalence of wasting syndrome reported in Puerto Rican AIDS patients. The other AIDS-indicator conditions most strongly associated with wasting syndrome were isosporiasis, pulmonary candidiasis, esophageal candidiasis, HIV encephalopathy, chronic mucocutaneous herpes simplex, and coccidioidomycosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

The association between HIV wasting syndrome and injecting drug use, and the significant racial/ethnic and geographic differences in prevalence of this AIDS diagnosis may reflect differences in diagnostic and reporting practices and/or access to medical care.

PMID:
8466680
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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