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Diabet Med. 1993 Mar;10(2):122-8.

Prothrombotic and antithrombotic factors are elevated in patients with type 1 diabetes complicated by microalbuminuria.

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1
University Department of Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

Increased urinary albumin loss in patients with Type 1 diabetes is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis. Prothrombotic factors known to be associated with cerebrovascular and coronary artery disease in the general population, antithrombotic factors, were studied in 52 patients with Type 1 diabetes and varying urinary albumin loss and 24 non-diabetic control subjects. Fibrinogen increased from 2.5 g l-1 (95% confidence interval 2.3-2.8) in control subjects and 2.8 g l-1 (2.6-3.0) in diabetic patients without microalbuminuria to 3.1 g l-1 (2.7-3.5) with microalbuminuria (p < 0.005 vs control; p < 0.001 vs without microalbuminuria). Factor VIIc increased from 81% (75-86% in non-diabetic control subjects and 84% (78-90%) in diabetic patients without microalbuminuria to 103% (89-117%) with microalbuminuria (p < 0.005 vs control; p < 0.05 vs without microalbuminuria) and 118% (86-150%) with albuminuria (p < 0.005 vs control and p < 0.001 vs without microalbuminuria). Levels of the antithrombotic factors protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III also rose in the diabetic patients with evidence of renal damage. Elevation of prothrombotic factors has been associated with increased risk of microvascular disease, whereas elevation of antithrombotic factors has no known protective effect. Therefore, this pattern of alteration of haemostatic factors in diabetic renal disease may contribute to the increased risk of vascular disease associated with both microalbuminuria and albuminuria.

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