Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Apr;147(4):382-5.

Compliance with childhood cholesterol screening among members of a prepaid health plan.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Oakland, CA 94611-5693.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess compliance with cholesterol screening and intervention by children who were members of a prepaid health plan in which there was no financial barrier to intervention.

RESEARCH DESIGN:

Children with family histories of hypercholesterolemia, coronary heart disease, and stroke were advised to have a random cholesterol test. Those with total cholesterol levels of 4.80 mmol/L (185 mg/dL) or higher were asked to return for a fasting blood test; of this group, compliant subjects with low-density lipoprotein values of 3.25 mmol/L (125 mg/dL) or higher were offered a nutrition program.

SETTING:

Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Oakland, Calif.

SUBJECTS AND PARTICIPANTS:

The parents of 1160 children aged 2 to 18 years who had routine pediatric appointments at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center were asked to complete screening forms on family history.

SELECTION PROCEDURES:

Children with family histories of hypercholesterolemia, coronary heart disease, and stroke were advised to have a random cholesterol test. Subjects with total cholesterol levels of 4.80 mmol/L or higher were asked to return for a fasting test, and subjects with low-density lipoprotein levels of 3.25 mmol/L or higher were offered a nutrition program.

INTERVENTIONS:

Telephone call, letter, low-cholesterol diet, and nutrition program.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Of the 1,160 subjects contacted, 529 (46%) had positive family histories. Of these subjects, random blood cholesterol levels were determined for 369 (70%); 160 (30%) did not comply. Ninety-three subjects had total cholesterol levels of 4.80 mmol/L or higher; of these, 35 (38%) did not comply with follow-up testing. Of the 58 compliant subjects, 25 (43%) had low-density lipoprotein values of 3.25 mmol/L or higher and were offered either a 3-week or a 6-week nutrition program. Only nine subjects (36%) enrolled; 16 (64%) did not comply.

CONCLUSIONS:

Parents do not comply well with a childhood cholesterol screening program that involves two blood tests and moderately intensive educational intervention. Compliance is an important component of cholesterol screening and intervention.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center