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Clin Infect Dis. 1993 Feb;16(2):237-46.

Meningococcal disease in The Netherlands, 1958-1990: a steady increase in the incidence since 1982 partially caused by new serotypes and subtypes of Neisseria meningitidis.

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1
Institute for Research in Extramural Medicine, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

In order to explain a threefold increase in the incidence of meningococcal disease in the Netherlands during the 1980s, we serotyped and subtyped Neisseria meningitidis isolates recovered between 1958 and 1990 from > 3,000 patients with systemic disease. No single strain could be held responsible for the increase. Apart from the newly introduced strain B:4:P1.4, which became the most prevalent phenotype in 1990 (21% of all isolates), the majority of the cases in 1990 were caused by many different strains that were already present in the Netherlands before 1980. For the period 1980-1990, a shift in the age distribution of patients with meningococcal disease from younger to older age categories was found, particularly with regard to cases due to meningococci of serogroup B; this shift is explained by the changing distribution of serotypes and subtypes within serogroup B. A polyvalent group B, class 1 outer-membrane-protein vaccine of a stable composition could theoretically have prevented approximately 80% of all group B meningococcal infections in the Netherlands during the past 30 years.

PMID:
8443302
DOI:
10.1093/clind/16.2.237
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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