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JAMA. 1993 Mar 17;269(11):1401-3.

Health behavior and outcomes in sequential pregnancies of black and white adolescents.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, University of Albama, Birmingham 35294-0008.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relationships among parity, preterm delivery, fetal growth retardation, and prenatal care utilization in first and second adolescent pregnancies.

DESIGN:

A longitudinal, retrospective study in which obstetric, behavioral, and sociodemographic data were used to examine birth outcomes of 737 low-income black (80%) and white (20%) teenagers delivering first and second singleton infants at 20 or more weeks' gestation.

SETTING:

Public health clinics in Jefferson County, Alabama, between January 1983 and February 1990.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Mean birth weight, preterm delivery, fetal growth retardation, Apgar scores, and perinatal mortality.

MAIN RESULTS:

In their second pregnancies, adolescents presented 2.8 weeks later for care (P = .0001) and made fewer total clinic visits. Mean infant birth weight increased by 91 g (P = .0005). This increase was significantly associated with an increase in maternal prepregnancy body mass index. The rate of fetal growth retardation decreased (P = .0001) and the rate of preterm delivery increased (P < .02) in the second pregnancy. The rate of recurrence of fetal growth retardation was 13% and the rate of preterm delivery was 46%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Poorer utilization of prenatal care and high risk for recurrence of adverse outcomes are characteristic of adolescents' second pregnancies and should be considered in teenage pregnancy intervention programs.

PMID:
8441215
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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