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J Clin Invest. 1993 Oct;92(4):1752-8.

Intravenous glucose suppresses glucose production but not proteolysis in extremely premature newborns.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis 46202-5210.

Abstract

To ascertain whether the inability to suppress glucose production and increase glucose utilization in response to glucose infusion is an inherent characteristic of immature individuals, we determined glucose rate of appearance (R(a)) in minimally stressed, clinically stable, extremely premature infants (approximately 26-wk gestation) at two glucose infusion rates (6.2 +/- 0.4 and 9.5 +/- 0.5 mg/kg per min). We also assessed whether an increase in glucose delivery suppresses proteolysis by measuring the R(a) of phenylalanine and leucine. Glucose R(a) (and utilization) increased significantly at the higher glucose infusion rate (7.9 +/- 0.5 vs. 9.8 +/- 0.6 mg/kg per min). Glucose production persisted at the lower glucose infusion rate but was suppressed to nearly zero at the higher rate (1.7 +/- 0.5 vs. 0.3 +/- 0.1 mg/kg per min). Proteolysis was unaffected by the higher glucose infusion rate as reflected by no change in the rates of appearance of either phenylalanine (96 +/- 5 vs. 95 +/- 3 mumol/kg per h) or leucine (285 +/- 20 vs. 283 +/- 14 mumol/kg per h). Thus, clinically stable, extremely premature infants suppress glucose production and increase glucose utilization in response to increased glucose infusion, demonstrating no inherent immaturity of these processes. In contrast, increasing the rate of glucose delivery results in no change in whole body proteolysis in these infants. The regulation of proteolysis in this population remains to be defined.

PMID:
8408627
PMCID:
PMC288336
DOI:
10.1172/JCI116763
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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