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Gastroenterology. 1993 Oct;105(4):1117-25.

Effect of D-glucose on intestinal permeability and its passive absorption in human small intestine in vivo.

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1
Department of Internal Medicine, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Based on studies in animals, it has been proposed that carrier-mediated D-glucose absorption markedly enhances passive permeability of the jejunal mucosa, allowing the majority of D-glucose absorption to proceed passively. In this study, we evaluated this hypothesis in the human jejunum in vivo.

METHODS:

Using the constant perfusion, nonabsorbable marker technique, permeability of jejunal mucosa was assessed by measuring the ratio of diffusion rates of urea/L-xylose and mannitol/L-xylose. Passive D-glucose absorption was quantitated using L-glucose and mannitol as probes for D-glucose.

RESULTS:

Addition of D-glucose to perfused solutions did not change the diffusion ratios, indicating that D-glucose has no effect on the size of channels for passive diffusion across the jejunal mucosa. The fraction of total D-glucose absorption that could be attributed to a passive mechanism averaged 5%. In the human ileum in vivo, we detected no evidence of passive D-glucose absorption.

CONCLUSIONS:

Carrier-mediated D-glucose absorption does not increase passive permeability of human jejunal mucosa to solutes with molecular radii between 2.6 and 4.0 A. The amount of D-glucose absorbed passively from the human jejunum is trivial compared with the overwhelmingly dominant mechanism, carrier-mediated transport. Our results do not support the concept that sodium-dependent nutrient transport increases tight junction permeability.

PMID:
8405857
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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