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Exp Neurol. 1993 Oct;123(2):204-15.

Neuronal vacuolization and necrosis induced by the noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist MK(+)801 (dizocilpine maleate): a light and electron microscopic evaluation of the rat retrosplenial cortex.

Author information

1
Toxicology Research Laboratories, Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Greenfield, Indiana 46140.

Abstract

MK(+)801 (dizocilpine maleate) is a noncompetitive antagonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, the major glutamate receptor at excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. Since NMDA antagonists are neuroprotective, there is interest in their development for treatment of cerebral ischemia. Unfortunately, many of these compounds also induce vacuole formation in neurons of the rat retrosplenial cortex (Olney et al., Science 244: 1360-1362, 1989). Although vacuolization was initially reported to be reversible with MK(+)801, preliminary data later suggested that higher doses might produce neuronal necrosis. To explore this issue, young male Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single subcutaneous dose of vehicle or 1, 5, or 10 mg/kg MK(+)801. At 4 h and 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 days postdose (DPD), the retrosplenial cortex was examined by light and electron microscopy. At 4 h, vacuoles occurred in neurons of retrosplenial cortical layers 3 and 4 in all rats given MK(+)801. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum contributed to vacuole formation. At 1 DPD, vacuoles or necrotic neurons were rarely observed. At all subsequent time points, necrotic neurons were readily evident in rats given 5 or 10 mg/kg MK(+)801, but only rarely evident in rats given 1 mg/kg. Necrotic neurons were associated with reactive microglial cells that contained electron-dense debris ultrastructurally. If similar dose-dependent neuronal necrosis proves to be a feature of other NMDA antagonists, such effects might raise concerns for the development and use of these compounds in human cerebrovascular diseases.

PMID:
8405286
DOI:
10.1006/exnr.1993.1153
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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