Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acta Neuropathol. 1993;86(1):55-64.

Patterns of neuronal degeneration in the motor cortex of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

Author information

1
Neurology Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114.

Abstract

We examined patterns of neuronal degeneration in the motor cortex of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients using traditional cell stains and several histochemical markers including neurofilament, parvalbumin, NADPH-diaphorase, ubiquitin, Alz-50 and tau. Three grades of ALS (mild, moderate, severe) were defined based on the extent of Betz cell depletion. Non-phosphorylated neurofilament immunoreactive cortical pyramidal neurons and non-pyramidal parvalbumin local circuit neurons were significantly depleted in all grades of ALS. In contrast, NADPH-diaphorase neurons and Alz-50-positive neurons were quantitatively preserved despite reduced NADPH-diaphorase cellular staining and dendritic pruning. The density of ubiquitin-positive structures in the middle and deep layers of the motor cortex was increased in all cases. Axonal tau immunoreactivity was not altered. These histochemical results suggest that cortical degeneration in ALS is distinctive from other neurodegenerative diseases affecting cerebral cortex. Unlike Huntington's disease, both pyramidal and local cortical neurons are affected in ALS; unlike Alzheimer's disease, alteration of the neuronal cytoskeleton is not prominent. The unique pattern of neuronal degeneration found in ALS motor cortex is consistent with non-N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor-mediated cytotoxicity.

PMID:
8396837
DOI:
10.1007/bf00454899
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center