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Virology. 1993 Apr;193(2):834-41.

Initiation of human cytomegalovirus infection requires initial interaction with cell surface heparan sulfate.

Author information

1
Department of Immunology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037.

Abstract

In this report, we demonstrate that the initial event in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is attachment to extracellular heparan sulfate. Further, this interaction is important for initiation of infection in fibroblast cells. Using microbinding assays to specifically monitor virus attachment as well as plaque titration assays to measure infectivity, we found that heparin competition as well as enzymatic digestion of cells with heparinase blocked virus attachment, initiation of immediate-early gene expression and infectivity. Other major glycosaminoglycans were found not to be involved in HCMV attachment and infectivity. In addition, HCMV was unable to attach to mutant derivatives of Chinese hamster ovary cells deficient in synthesis of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Basic fibroblast growth factor, which requires initial interaction with extracellular heparin prior to binding to its high affinity receptor, also inhibited HCMV attachment to cells. Time-course experiments revealed that the initial HCMV binding was sensitive to heparin competition (10 micrograms/ml) or 0.75 M salt washes. The initial heparin-dissociable binding converted rapidly to high affinity (heparin resistant) HCMV attachment. These data suggest that sequential receptor interactions may mediate HCMV adsorption to cells. Heparin affinity chromatography revealed that multiple HCMV envelope glycoproteins, including gB, are capable of binding to heparin.

PMID:
8384757
DOI:
10.1006/viro.1993.1192
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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