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J Am Coll Cardiol. 1993 Oct;22(4 Suppl A):14A-19A.

Natural history and patterns of current practice in heart failure. The Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) Investigators.

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1
Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Abstract

A total of 6,273 consecutive relatively unselected patients with heart failure or left ventricular dysfunction, or both (mean age 62 +/- 12 years, mean ejection fraction 31 +/- 9%), were enrolled in the Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) Registry over a period of 14 months. All patients were followed up for vital status and hospital admissions at 1 year. Ischemic heart disease was the underlying cause of failure or dysfunction in approximately 70% of patients, whereas hypertensive heart disease was considered to be primarily involved in only 7%. There were striking differences in the etiology of heart failure among blacks and whites: 73% of whites had an ischemic etiology of failure versus only 36% of blacks; 32% of blacks had a hypertensive condition versus only 4% of whites. The total 1-year mortality rate was 18%; 19% of patients had hospital admissions for heart failure and 27% either died or had a hospital admission for congestive heart failure during the 1st year of follow-up. Factors related to 1-year mortality or hospital admission for congestive heart failure included age, ejection fraction, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation and female gender. There was no difference in mortality associated with congestive heart failure among blacks and whites, but hospital admissions for heart failure were more frequent in blacks. Digitalis and diuretic agents were the drugs most often used in these patients, who were often taking many medications in relation to severity of congestive heart failure symptoms and ejection fraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
8376685
DOI:
10.1016/0735-1097(93)90456-b
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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