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Am J Dis Child. 1993 Sep;147(9):965-8.

Immunization status and reasons for immunization delay among children using public health immunization clinics.

Author information

1
Valley Young People's Clinic, PS, Spokane.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine whether children attending our local health department clinics were being immunized in a timely manner, and to investigate the reasons for children not being immunized on schedule.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional research design.

SETTING:

Five Salt Lake City/County Health Department immunization clinics in Utah.

PARTICIPANTS:

All patients presenting to the clinics for immunization from November 1990 to March 1991 when minor illness is prevalent.

INTERVENTIONS:

Data were gathered through interview and questionnaire.

MEASUREMENTS/MAIN RESULTS:

Children were mostly white; they came from two-parent households with reasonably high incomes and high parental education level. Only four children were denied vaccination, all for inappropriate timing. None were denied for illness. More than 75% had postponed bringing their children in for immunization. The most common reason given for delay was minor illness in the child.

CONCLUSION:

Even in this "low-risk" population, parental misperception regarding immunizations is a significant, contributing factor to low immunization rates. Public educational programs directed at increasing parental knowledge must be developed.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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