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J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1993 Sep;106(3):398-405.

Pulmonary vascular disease and operative indications in complete atrioventricular canal defect in early infancy.

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1
Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.

Abstract

Pulmonary vascular disease was morphometrically analyzed in 67 patients (mean age, 19 months) with isolated complete atrioventricular canal defect. Complete obstruction of the small pulmonary arterial lumen resulting from acute fibrous proliferation and atrophy of the peripheral arterial media, which were considered absolute operative contraindications, were characteristic in six patients with Down's syndrome. Morphometric analysis of medial thickness revealed that thinning of the media of the small pulmonary arteries is generally observed at around 6 months of age in patients with complete atrioventricular canal defect and that the media in patients who have complete atrioventricular canal defect and Down's syndrome was thinner than that in such patients without Down's syndrome. These results suggest that thinning of the media as a result of two factors--Down's syndrome and aging--facilitates the rapid occurrence of fibrous intimal proliferation. Therefore intracardiac repair is desirable within 6 months of life, before medial thinning, in patients with complete atrioventricular canal defect and Down's syndrome. Excluding patients with absolute operative contraindications, the scores of the index of pulmonary vascular disease in operative survivors were below 2.0 and death occurred when scores were more than 2.2. The pulmonary vascular resistances measured in room air and by the oxygen inhalation and tolazoline tests in patients with operative contraindications were more than 7.3, 3.8, and 6.6 units.m2, respectively. We thus conclude that lung biopsy should be undertaken for patients in whom pulmonary vascular resistance is beyond these values to determine the appropriateness of surgical intervention.

PMID:
8361179
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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