Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Diet Assoc. 1993 Sep;93(9):1025-30.

Metabolic and anthropometric changes in female weight cyclers and controls over a 1-year period.

Author information

1
School of Family and Nutritional Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Women who diet to lose weight often regain the weight over time, and the cycle repeats itself. The objective of this study was to identify a group of female weight cyclers and to match them with a control group who had never consciously tried to lose weight. For 1 year, weight patterns, eating habits, metabolic parameters, and body composition were assessed to determine whether there was a relationship between weight cycling and these variables.

DESIGN:

Measurements were done at baseline and at 6 and 12 months. Changes in weight, diet, and exercise were monitored throughout the year.

SETTING:

All testing was done at a university physiology laboratory.

SUBJECTS/SAMPLES:

Nine weight cyclers with a notable history of dieting and food restriction were recruited. Subsequently, nine control subjects were selected and matched for age, height, weight, lean body mass, and exercise habits.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

The observational study included measures of 3-day diet records, skinfold and girth, serum glucose, insulin and triiodothyronine, and resting energy expenditure.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED:

The main variables were analyzed using a 2 x 3 (diet group x time) analysis of variance with repeated measures on the time factor. Comparison of the means was done by Tukey post hoc test.

RESULTS:

A 7-point satisfaction scale indicated that the weight cyclers were dissatisfied with their weight compared with the noncyclers (P = .03). Otherwise, there were no differences between groups in dietary intakes or the physiologic variables.

APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS:

In the parameters measured, a history of weight cycling did not affect the metabolic profiles of the weight cyclers compared with the noncyclers.

PMID:
8360407
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center