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J Am Diet Assoc. 1993 Sep;93(9):1017-24.

Identifying predictive variables for long-term weight change after participation in a weight loss program.

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1
Department of Medicine, Marshall University School of Medicine, Huntington, WV 25701.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN:

To determine if there was an association between weight change and 31 independent variables among obese persons 2 years after a weight loss program. Data were obtained from subjects' records and from questionnaires administered at enrollment and after a 2-year follow-up.

SETTING:

The 8-week weight control program was taught by registered dietitians and developed by the staff at the Sid Richardson Institute for Preventive Medicine, Houston, Tex.

SUBJECTS/SAMPLES:

Of the 1,460 subjects who attended at least one of eight classes, 509 subjects (123 men and 386 women) responded to the mailed follow-up questionnaire.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Associations between weight change and the 31 independent variables were assessed. Heights and weights were measured by the dietitians during treatment. Two-year follow-up weights were self-reported.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED:

Analysis of variance was used for 16 of the independent variables. For the remaining variables we performed a test of the null hypothesis that the correlation coefficient was 0 based on the test of the regression coefficient between the independent and dependent variable. A stepwise regression process was used to determine the best combination of variables predictive of weight change.

RESULTS:

Of the 31 independent variables, 16 were significantly predictive of weight change. The adjusted R2 for the entire group of 16 variables was .379. Thus, 37.9% of the variance was explained by the joint efforts of the 16 variables. Eight variables with an adjusted R2 of .371 (accounting for 37.1% of the variance) were most important: feeling in control of eating habits, percentage over ideal body weight at enrollment, percentage of weight lost during the 8-week treatment, frequency of weight measurement, increase in physical activity, frequency of eating in response to emotions, number of pounds gained before subject resumed diet, and occupation. APPLICATION/CONCLUSION: The predictive variables for weight change may be useful to professionals who treat obese clients and may improve success rates of long-term weight loss.

PMID:
8360406
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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