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J Intern Med. 1993 Sep;234(3):317-23.

The cost-effectiveness of treating hypertension in elderly people--an analysis of the Swedish Trial in Old Patients with Hypertension (STOP Hypertension).

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1
Centre for Health Economics, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of antihypertensive treatment in elderly people based on the results of the Swedish Trial in Old Patients with Hypertension (STOP Hypertension).

DESIGN:

The STOP Hypertension study was a randomized trial comparing active antihypertensive treatment with a placebo. The risk of stroke, cardiovascular disease and total mortality was significantly reduced in the actively treated group compared to placebo.

SETTING:

One hundred and sixteen primary health care centres in Sweden.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 1627 hypertensive patients aged 70-84. No patient was lost to follow-up.

INTERVENTIONS:

Antihypertensive treatment with beta blockers and diuretics for a mean follow-up of 25 months.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

The cost-effectiveness ratio estimated as the net cost (the treatment cost minus saved costs of reduced cardiovascular morbidity) divided by the number of life-years gained (the increase in life expectancy from treatment).

RESULTS:

The cost per life-year gained was estimated as SEK 5000 for men and SEK 15,000 for women ($1 = SEK 6; 1 pound = SEK 10). The cost per life-year gained did not exceed SEK 100,000 in any of the sensitivity analyses.

CONCLUSIONS:

It is concluded that treatment of elderly hypertensive patients with beta blockers and/or diuretics is cost-effective according to the results of the STOP Hypertension study.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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