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Ann Surg. 1993 Aug;218(2):206-10.

A prospective, randomized evaluation of the effect of silver impregnated subcutaneous cuffs for preventing tunneled chronic venous access catheter infections in cancer patients.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study was performed to evaluate the effect of a silver-impregnated cuff on the incidence of catheter-related bacteremia/fungemia or tunnel tract infection in cancer patients with chronic dual-lumen tunneled venous access catheters.

SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA:

Infection is a frequent and potentially life-threatening complication of tunneled chronic cuffed silastic central venous access catheters in cancer patients. Recent experience with antimicrobial silver-impregnated cuffs placed on nontunneled percutaneously inserted central venous catheters suggests that such a cuff may render the catheter less prone to infection.

METHODS:

The authors prospectively randomized 200 cancer patients to receive either a dual-lumen 10 French tunneled cuffed silastic central venous access catheter or the same catheter with a second more proximal subcutaneous silver-impregnated cuff. All patients then were followed prospectively for infectious morbidity until the device was removed or the patient died.

RESULTS:

The hazard rate for infection/day (95% confidence limits) was 0.0022 (0.0015 to 0.0030) for standard catheters compared with 0.0027 (0.0019 to 0.0037) for catheters with silver-impregnated cuffs (p = not significant). Regression analysis of infection-free interval of both catheter types shows no difference over the lifetime of catheter as well as the over the first 48 days after insertion.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study indicated no effect of a silver-impregnated cuff in decreasing the incidence of catheter-related bacteremias/fungemias, tunnel infections, or the spectrum of causative microorganisms involved in cancer patients with tunneled chronic venous access catheters.

PMID:
8343002
PMCID:
PMC1242932
DOI:
10.1097/00000658-199308000-00014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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