Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1993 Jun;14(3):169-75.

In-office survey of children's hazard exposure in the Chicago area: age-specific exposure information and methodological lessons. Pediatric Practice Research Group.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Illinois 60614.

Abstract

Anticipatory guidance on injury prevention should reflect the risks children face, yet hazard exposure information is generally unavailable. The objectives of this study were (1) to obtain information on age-specific exposure of Chicago-area children to amusement park rides, sleds, snow discs, bunkbeds, skateboards, fireworks, toboggans, and air guns and (2) to assess methodological issues in gathering exposure information by parental survey in pediatric practices. Questionnaires were received from 679 families, including 1469 children. The proportion of families with at least one exposed child varied: amusement park rides (94%), sleds (67%), snow discs (25%), bunkbeds (24%), skateboards (22%), fireworks (17%), toboggans (15%), and air guns and rifles (6%). Use of skateboards, air guns and rifles, and bunkbeds was highest in males. Use of skateboards, air guns and rifles, and snow discs peaked among young adolescents (ages 10 to 14), whereas use of sleds, toboggans and amusement park rides peaked among young children (ages 5 to 9) and young adolescents. Use of bunkbeds peaked among young children. Log linear analyses found: the likelihood of exposure to sleds and snow discs was highest in rural communities and for families owning their own home; toboggan exposure was highest among home owners; air gun and rifle exposure was highest in rural areas; fireworks exposure decreased with increased paternal education; exposure to skateboards was highest in single family dwellings and suburban home owners. This study generates the only available current estimates for use of these products, and demonstrates that in-office parental surveys concerning exposure are feasible. The findings can help guide future hazard exposure research and may affect anticipatory guidance in some settings.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
8340471
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center