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Scand J Gastroenterol. 1993 Jun;28(6):487-94.

Acute effects of smoking during modified sham feeding in duodenal ulcer patients. An analysis of nicotine, acid secretion, gastrin, catecholamines, epidermal growth factor, prostaglandin E2, and bile acids.

Author information

1
Dept. of Surgery, Helsinborg Hospital, Sweden.

Abstract

Smoking is associated with an increased incidence of duodenal ulcer with a high relapse rate, and smokers tend to be slow healers. The etiology responsible for this remains unknown, and there is general disagreement as to whether smoking affects gastric secretion. The aim of the present study was to investigate both aggressive and protective factors in response to vagal stimulation induced by modified sham feeding (MSF) in duodenal ulcer patients when smoking versus not smoking. On smoking days, nicotine concentrations in plasma averaged about 15 ng/ml and were extremely high in saliva and gastric juice (> 1300 and > 800 ng/ml, respectively). MSF induced a significant decrease in intragastric pH during non-smoking (p = 0.01) but not during smoking. Acid output 1 h after MSF was lower on smoking than on non-smoking days (p = 0.02), as was volume secretion (p = 0.02). Plasma gastrin concentrations were significantly increased during MSF on non-smoking days (p = 0.04) but not on smoking days, the concentrations during the whole day being lower on smoking days (p = 0.002). Plasma catecholamine levels were unaffected by MSF, whether smoking or not. However, plasma concentrations of noradrenaline decreased during the smoking of a single cigarette (p = 0.03), whereas those of adrenaline were increased on smoking days (p = 0.02). Epidermal growth factor concentrations were decreased in gastric juice after MSF during non-smoking (p = 0.01) but not during smoking. Although prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations in gastric juice were unaffected by MSF, PGE2 output increased after MSF whether smoking or not, the increment being non-significantly less during smoking (p = 0.09).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
8322024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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