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Anaesthesia. 1994 Jan;49(1):62-5.

Studies in postoperative sequelae. Nausea and vomiting--still a problem.

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1
Department of Anaesthetics, Western Infirmary, Glasgow.

Abstract

We collected data on postoperative nausea and vomiting from 3850 patients aged 11-91 years. Thirty-seven percent of the 3244 patients who received a general anaesthetic reported nausea and 23.2% vomited. Twenty percent of the 606 patients who received a local anaesthetic reported nausea and 11.4% vomited. Of the general anaesthetic patients reporting nausea, 72.2% were women, and the mean age was lower than for those who did not (p < 0.001). Similarly for vomiting, 74.0% were women and again the mean age was lower (p < 0.001). Of the local anaesthetic patients reporting nausea, 62.0% were women and the mean age was lower than for those who did not (p < 0.001). Similarly for vomiting, 68.1% were women and again the mean age was lower (p < 0.001). Anxiety before general, but not local, anaesthesia was associated with postoperative nausea (p < 0.001) but not vomiting. Patients from the gynaecological, orthopaedic, ENT and general surgical wards had higher incidences of postoperative nausea and vomiting. Linear visual analogue pain scores were higher in patients with postoperative nausea and vomiting in both general and local anaesthesia groups (p < 0.001).

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