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Am J Physiol. 1994 Jan;266(1 Pt 2):R27-39.

Reflex regulation of renal nerve activity in cardiac failure.

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1
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City.

Abstract

Efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) is increased in the rat with low-cardiac-output congestive heart failure (CHF; myocardial infarction). Arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ERSNA in CHF and control rats was examined. Cardiac index and arterial pressure were lower and total peripheral resistance index, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and heart-to-body weight ratio were higher in CHF than in control rats. Increases in left ventricular end diastolic pressure produced by intravenous volume loading failed to increase cardiac index in CHF rats as it did in control rats. Single-unit analysis of aortic baroreceptor nerve activity showed that CHF rats had higher pressure threshold, lower frequency at pressure threshold, and lower gain than control rats. Arterial baroreflex control of ERSNA was attenuated; this was due to diminished gain of the afferent limb while the gain of the central portion of the reflex was normal. Single-unit analysis of vagal nerve activity showed that CHF rats had higher pressure threshold, lower frequency at saturation, and lower gain than control rats. Cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ERSNA was attenuated; this was due to diminished gain of the afferent limb while the gain of the central portion of the reflex was normal. In the CHF rat, arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ERSNA is markedly attenuated because of abnormalities in the periphery at the level of the aortic and cardiopulmonary receptors, respectively, and not in the central nervous system.

PMID:
8304550
DOI:
10.1152/ajpregu.1994.266.1.R27
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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