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Am J Cardiol. 1994 Jan 15;73(2):170-4.

Exercise testing and training in physically disabled men with clinical evidence of coronary artery disease.

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1
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, School of Medicine, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322.

Abstract

A prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and a concurrent physical disability evaluated the effects of a home exercise training program on cardiovascular function and blood lipids. Eighty-eight men between the ages of 42 and 72 years (mean 62) with documented CAD and a physical disability with functional use of > or = 2 extremities including 1 arm were randomized to either a 6-month home exercise training program using wheelchair ergometry or to a control group that received usual and customary care. Both groups received dietary instructions and were requested to follow a fat-controlled diet. Exercise test variables with echocardiography and blood lipids were measured at baseline and at 6 months. The home exercise training group significantly improved both peak exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (p = 0.007) and fractional shortening (p = 0.01) between baseline to 6 months, whereas the control group showed no significant changes. Exercise training effects of decreased resting heart rate (p = 0.03) and decreased peak rate pressure product (p = 0.03) were also found in the treatment group. No exercise-related cardiac complications occurred. Both groups significantly (p < or = 0.01) increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. These results indicate that physically disabled men with CAD can safely participate in a home exercise training program which may result in intrinsic cardiac benefits. The metabolic cost of activities of daily living imposed on this disabled population may also have a positive effect on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels.

PMID:
8296738
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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