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Am J Emerg Med. 1994 Jan;12(1):92-3.

Traumatic train injuries.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, St Louis University Medical Center, MO 63110-0250.

Abstract

Train accidents involving motor vehicles and pedestrians can be devastating. Approximately 1,234 fatalities were recorded in the United States in 1989. The literature from the United States is sparse, prompting a 7-year review of 23 consecutive train accident victims. Twenty (87%) were male, with an average age of 30.6 years. Sixteen (70%) were intoxicated at the time of the accident, and the average Injury Severity Score was 21.4. There was a total of eight traumatic amputations occurring in the 11 (48%) patients involved as pedestrians. Two of these were railroad workers, and nine were trespassers. Fourteen (61%) accidents occurred between the hours of 2300 and 0700. Three (14%) patients died. Although alcohol use occurred in 16 (70%), there was no significance between alcohol use and amputation. Thus, non-railroad employed pedestrians, because of a lack of protection, are more prone to traumatic amputations, primarily of the lower extremities, than those involved in motor vehicle accidents.

PMID:
8285985
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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