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Eur J Neurosci. 1993 Jul 1;5(7):968-75.

Interaction of the amygdala with the frontal lobe in reward memory.

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1
Department of Experimental Psychology, Oxford University, UK.

Abstract

Five cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were assessed for their ability to associate visual stimuli with food reward. They learned a series of new two-choice visual discriminations between coloured patterns displayed on a touch-sensitive monitor screen; the feedback for correct choice was delivery of food. Normal learning in this task is known to be dependent on the amygdala. The monkeys received brain lesions which were designed to disconnect the amygdala from interaction with other brain structures thought to be involved in this memory task. All the monkeys received an amygdalectomy in one hemisphere and lesions in the other hemisphere of some of the projection targets of the amygdala, namely the ventral striatum, the mediodorsal thalamus and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. The rate of learning new problems was assessed before and after each operation. Disconnection of the amygdala from the ventral striatum was without effect on learning rate. An earlier study had shown that disconnection of the amygdala from either the mediodorsal thalamus or the ventromedial prefrontal cortex produced only a mild impairment, significantly less severe than that produced by bilateral lesions of any of these three structures. The present results show, however, that disconnection of the amygdala from both the mediodorsal thalamus and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in the same animal, by crossed unilateral lesions of the amygdala in one hemisphere and of both the mediodorsal thalamus and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in the other hemisphere, produces an impairment as severe as that which follows bilateral lesions of any of these three structures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
8281307
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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