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J Clin Oncol. 1994 Jan;12(1):64-9.

Prognostic significance of p53 immunostaining in epithelial ovarian cancer.

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1
Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the prognostic significance of p53 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer, including a subset of stage I patients, and to look for correlations between p53 expression and other disease parameters, including stage, grade, age, histologic subtype, second-look results, ploidy, and percent S phase.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We analyzed p53 expression in 284 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer using immunohistochemical techniques in paraffin-embedded specimens. There were 36 patients with stage I disease, 20 with stage II disease, 186 with stage III disease, and 42 with stage IV disease.

RESULTS:

p53 immunoreactivity was present in 177 cases (62%). p53 expression was associated with grade 3 to 4 disease (P = .003). The following factors were associated with a decrease in overall survival in a univarate analysis: stage III or IV disease (P = .0001), grade 3 or 4 disease (P = .0001), age above the median (P = .0002), and p53 reactivity (P = .04). In a multivariate analysis, stage, grade, and age retained independent prognostic significance. In the subset of 36 stage I patients, p53 positively approached statistical significance (P = .10) as a negative prognostic factor in a univariate analysis.

CONCLUSION:

Abnormalities of p53 expression occur commonly in epithelial ovarian cancer. Although associated with decreased survival in a univariate analysis, this biologic marker did not retain independent prognostic significance in a multivariate analysis. p53 expression should be studied in a larger cohort of early-stage patients, where accurate prognostic information is needed to direct therapy.

PMID:
8270986
DOI:
10.1200/JCO.1994.12.1.64
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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