Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetologia. 1993 Nov;36(11):1155-62.

Insulin autoantibodies and high titre islet cell antibodies are preferentially associated with the HLA DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 haplotype at clinical type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus before age 10 years, but not at onset between age 10 and 40 years. The Belgian Diabetes Registry.

Author information

1
Diabetes Research Centre, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium.

Abstract

Demographic and biological data were collected from all Caucasian Type 1 diabetic patients (n = 279) who were recruited at clinical onset by the Belgian Diabetes Registry over 34 months. The male/female ratio was significantly higher for onset between age 20 and 40 years (2.4) than before age 20 years (1.0); no age-or sex-differences were noticed in serum fructosamine concentration. Total and high concentrations of insulin autoantibodies and islet cell antibodies were preferentially associated with the HLA DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 susceptibility haplotype. The occurrence of both types of antibodies was also correlated, irrespective of haplotype. At onset before age 10 years, the high risk genotype DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302/DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 was more prevalent than all other DQA1-DQB1 genotypes taken together, leading to a higher prevalence of the DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 haplotype in this age group (75%) than in the 10-39 years age group (54%). Under age 10 years, the presence of DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 was strongly associated with insulin autoantibodies (90%) and islet cell autoantibodies (92% with 85% of high titre), whereas patients without this haplotype were less frequently positive for insulin autoantibodies (31%) or islet cell autoantibodies (38% high titre). In the group with onset at age 10-39 years, the DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 haplotype presented a lower association with insulin autoantibodies (approximately 40%) and islet cell autoantibodies (50 to 65% high titre), prevalences which no longer differed from those in subjects lacking this haplotype.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
8270130
DOI:
10.1007/bf00401060
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center