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J Genet Psychol. 1993 Sep;154(3):407-16.

Are individual differences in fantasy play related to peer acceptance levels?

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02254-9110.

Abstract

Individual differences in fantasy play, as they relate to cognitive competence and peer acceptance, were examined in a sample of 66 children between the ages of 4 and 8 years. Each child's free-play behaviors were videotaped and then coded for frequency of fantasy play and nonfantasy play, as well as for the unreality level and unfamiliarity level of the fantasy play. Solitary play was rarely observed; therefore all play measures that were coded were social (i.e., play involving at least one partner). Cognitive competence measures included self-ratings and teacher ratings of academic skills. Peer acceptance measures included self-ratings and teacher ratings of friendships and social activities. Results showed that high-fantasy players had higher self-ratings of peer acceptance than did average-fantasy players. High-fantasy players, however, had lower teacher ratings of peer acceptance than did average-fantasy players. These differential relations could be related to an inability on the part of high-fantasy players to distinguish imagined popularity from actual peer acceptance levels. Future research is recommended to provide more detailed characterizations of individual differences in fantasy play and how they relate to outcomes in the social, cognitive, and affective domains.

PMID:
8245914
DOI:
10.1080/00221325.1993.10532194
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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