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Diabetologia. 1993 Oct;36(10):948-54.

Relationships between dyspeptic symptoms and gastrointestinal motility in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus.

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1
Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Reports on motor abnormalities in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus are inconsistent. In 20 Type 1 diabetic patients and in 11 control subjects antroduodenojejunal manometry was performed under euglycaemic conditions in order to examine the prevalence of gastric and small intestinal motor abnormalities in relation to dyspeptic symptoms and the degree of cardiac autonomic neuropathy. In diabetic patients compared to control subjects phase III (regular, high-amplitude contractile activity at maximal frequency) involved the gastric antrum less often (12 vs 35%, p < 0.05), the duration of phase I (motor quiescence) was shorter (6 +/- 1 vs 21 +/- 4 min, p < 0.002) and in phase II (irregular motor activity) the frequency of duodenal and jejunal contractions was higher. After a meal the duration of the fed state was shorter in diabetic patients with symptoms during the study than in diabetic patients without symptoms and than in control subjects (57 +/- 27 vs 157 +/- 11 and 140 +/- 13 min, p < 0.02). Postprandial antral hypomotility was seen in diabetic patients with symptoms only in the first 30 min after the meal. One hour after the meal the frequency of duodenal and jejunal contractions was again higher in diabetic patients. In diabetic patients compared to control subjects more burst activity (clusters of non-propagated high-amplitude contractile activity at maximal frequency) was seen (7.9 +/- 1.6 vs 0.8 +/- 0.5% of the total time of study, p < 0.002). No correlation was found between manometric parameters and the degree of cardiac autonomic neuropathy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
8243875
DOI:
10.1007/bf02374478
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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