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J Pediatr. 1993 Dec;123(6):921-8.

Major histocompatibility complex class II deficiency: clinical manifestations, immunologic features, and outcome.

Author information

1
Hôpital Necker Enfants Malades, Unité d'Immunologie et d'Hématologie, Paris, France.

Abstract

Major histocompatibility complex class II deficiency (bare lymphocyte syndrome) is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by profound defects in human leukocyte antigen class II expression, inconsistent and incomplete expression of human leukocyte antigen class I molecules, and a complete lack of cellular and humoral immune responses to foreign antigens. To define the clinical and immunologic characteristics, outcome, and natural history of major histocompatibility complex class II deficiency, we retrospectively analyzed 30 consecutive patients. Clinical onset occurred in the first year of life, usually involving recurrent bronchopulmonary infections and chronic diarrhea. The clinical course was complicated by viral meningoencephalitis, hepatitis, cholangitis, and various autoimmune phenomena. Prognosis was very poor: the mean age at the time of death was 4 years. The main cause of death was overwhelming viral infection. Recent advances in bone marrow transplantation have raised hopes of curative treatment: 6 of 14 patients who underwent bone marrow transplantation were cured. Long-term survival after human leukocyte antigen-identical and haploidentical bone marrow transplantation seemed to depend primarily on the presence of preexisting viral infections.

PMID:
8229525
DOI:
10.1016/s0022-3476(05)80388-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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