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Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1993 Oct;100(10):909-13.

Antiphospholipid antibodies in pregnancy: prevalence and clinical associations.

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1
Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, University of Auckland, National Women's Hospital, New Zealand.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine prevalence, clinical association and predictive power of antiphospholipid antibodies in pregnancy.

DESIGN:

To test for the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant in order to confirm prevalence data which imply that each antibody has the same clinical significance. A detailed obstetric history and the outcome measures were obtained from each patient in the study.

SETTING:

National Women's Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.

SUBJECTS:

Nine hundred and thirty-three consecutively booked pregnant women.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Prevalence of auto-antibodies; perinatal morbidity and mortality; incidence of pre-eclampsia, growth retardation and fetal distress.

RESULTS:

Nine women (1.0%) had anticardiolipin antibodies, 11 (1.2%) had lupus anticoagulant and two had both antibodies. The fetal mortality rate for women with antibodies was 167/1000. Pre-eclampsia occurred significantly more often in women with auto-antibodies.

CONCLUSION:

The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies is frequently associated with adverse pregnancy outcome (9/18 pregnancies). High titre anticardiolipin antibodies carry a poor prognosis.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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