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MMWR CDC Surveill Summ. 1994 Jun 10;43(1):1-8.

Surveillance for smoking-attributable mortality and years of potential life lost, by state--United States, 1990.

Abstract

PROBLEM/CONDITION:

Mortality and years of potential life lost attributable to cigarette smoking.

REPORTING PERIOD COVERED:

1990.

DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM:

Mortality and years of potential life lost were estimated for each state by using the Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity, and Economic Costs (SAMMEC) software. These estimates were based on attributable risk formulas for smoking-related causes of death. Estimates of smoking prevalence were obtained from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and the U.S. Bureau of the Census, and mortality data were obtained from CDC.

RESULTS:

The median estimate for the number of smoking-attributable deaths among states was 5,619 (range: 402 [Alaska] to 42,574 [California]). Within each state, the number of smoking-attributable deaths among males was approximately twice as high as among females. Utah had the lowest mortality rate (218.0 per 100,000 population) and the lowest percentage of all deaths attributable to cigarette smoking (13.4%). Nevada had the highest mortality rate (478.1 per 100,000 population) and the highest percentage of deaths from smoking (24.0%). The number of years of potential life lost ranged from 6,720 (Alaska) to 498,297 (California).

INTERPRETATION:

The number of deaths attributable to cigarette smoking in 1990 remained high. Efforts are needed to control tobacco use in all states.

ACTIONS TAKEN:

SAMMEC data are used in many states to assist policymakers in strengthening tobacco control efforts.

PMID:
8208238
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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