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J Pediatr. 1994 Jun;124(6):853-8.

Invasive pneumococcal disease among infected and uninfected children of mothers with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore 21201.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the incidence and clinical presentation of invasive pneumococcal disease in a cohort of children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who were prospectively followed from birth, in comparison with uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers and control children.

DESIGN:

Prospective follow-up of a cohort recruited at birth and born to mothers with known HIV status. The person-years analysis method used the occurrence of invasive pneumococcal disease as the end point.

SETTING:

Hospital-based clinic specializing in care of HIV-at-risk and HIV-infected children in Baltimore, Md.

PARTICIPANTS:

Forty-one vertically HIV-infected children, 128 uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers, and 71 control children born to mothers with negative findings for HIV but with HIV risk factors.

RESULTS:

Among HIV-infected children, 10 episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease occurred during the first 36 months of life compared with 4 episodes among uninfected children and 1 episode among control subjects. The relative risk for HIV-infected children versus the combined uninfected and control groups was 12.6 with a 95% confidence interval (5.4, 28.8) and a p value for difference between groups of < 0.001. The incidence rate per 100 child-years of observation during the first 36 months of life was 11.3 for HIV-infected, 1.1 for uninfected, and 0.5 for control children. Clinical and laboratory variables were not useful in identifying HIV-infected children at risk for pneumococcal disease.

CONCLUSION:

Practical strategies to prevent pneumococcal disease among HIV-infected children need to be developed.

PMID:
8201466
DOI:
10.1016/s0022-3476(05)83170-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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