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Accid Anal Prev. 1994 Apr;26(2):157-64.

Motorcycle crashes in New Zealand resulting in death and hospitalisation. I: Introduction methods and overview.

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1
Injury Prevention Research Unit, University of Otago Medical School, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Abstract

Relative to car crashes motorcycle crashes have received relatively little attention by the research community. This is the first in a series of three papers describing the epidemiology of motorcycle crashes resulting in death and hospitalisation in New Zealand. This paper describes the methods used for the study, provides an overview of all crashes, and, in particular, compares traffic crashes with nontraffic crashes. The source of the fatality data was national mortality data files for the years 1978 to 1987 inclusive. The source of the hospitalisation data was a national morbidity file, which records all public hospital discharges in New Zealand. A total of 1,175 motorcyclist fatalities were identified for the period 1978-1987, resulting in a mortality rate of 3.6 per 100,000 persons per year. A total of 2,623 motorcycle crash victims were hospitalised in 1988 resulting in a hospitalisation rate of 80.4 per 100,000 persons per year. Males, especially those 15-24 years of age had very high mortality (26-27) and morbidity rates (464-462). Motor vehicle traffic crashes represented 96% of the fatalities and 85% of the hospitalisations. Drivers were the victims in 88% of fatalities and 86% of hospitalisations. For hospitalised victims the leading injuries were to the lower limb (43%) and head (24%). Whereas 29% of the traffic crashes were AIS-3 or higher the comparable figure for nontraffic crashes was 19%. There has been a significant linear increase in the fatality rate between 1978 and 1988 but no comparable trend in hospitalisations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
8198684
DOI:
10.1016/0001-4575(94)90085-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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