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J Auton Nerv Syst. 1994 Apr;47(1-2):23-31.

Effects of supine blood pressure on interpretation of standing up test in 500 patients with diabetes mellitus.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Leiden University Hospital, The Netherlands.

Abstract

The relationship between fall in blood pressure (BP) on standing and supine BP before standing up was studied in 75 healthy controls and in 500 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) using conventional BP measurements. The influences of physiological (sex, age, height) and DM-related factors (type, duration, HbA1c-level, use of insulin, oral antidiabetic and anti-hypertensive medication) on BP-fall were assessed. The effects of using a fixed abnormality threshold and a new supine BP-related abnormality definition on interpretation of the test were determined. Highly significant relationships of BP-fall with supine BP were found in control and DM subjects. Slopes did not differ between these groups. Slopes for systolic BP-fall were steeper in type 1 than in type 2 DM patients. A forward stepwise regression procedure revealed that supine BP (explaining 24% of variance) and HbA1c (explaining 1%) had significant influences on systolic BP-fall. Diastolic supine BP explained 14% of diastolic BP-fall, age 3%, and sex 2%. Only supine BP was thus of practical relevance in explaining BP-fall. Taking supine BP into consideration affected test results: of 74 subjects with an abnormal conventional systolic BP-fall, 10 (13.5%) had been misclassified according to the new method, and 4 additional patients had been misclassified as normal. Classification changes were much larger for diastolic BP-fall (63% of conventionally abnormal results were reclassified as normal), but the range of diastolic BP is smaller than for systolic BP, meaning that the measurement error interferes with its clinical utility.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
8188981
DOI:
10.1016/0165-1838(94)90062-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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