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Am J Public Health. 1994 May;84(5):814-8.

5-A-DAY: dietary behavior and the fruit and vegetable intake of Latino children.

Author information

1
Center for Health Promotion, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, NY 10027.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of the study was to examine children's intake of fruits and vegetables in relation to the recent national "5-A-DAY" campaign.

METHODS:

Four 24-hour dietary recalls per child collected from 205 mothers of 4- to 5-year-old urban Latino children were used to analyze average 5-A-DAY fruit and vegetable consumption and examine associations between 5-A-DAY consumption, nutrient intakes, and eating patterns.

RESULTS:

The reported mean servings per day of fruits and vegetables, as defined by 5-A-DAY criteria, were 1.8 and 1.0, respectively, with only 6.8% (n = 14) of the children averaging five or more servings per day. Fruit juice accounted for 36% of 5-A-DAY servings. There were significant linear trends in intake of vitamins A and C, potassium, iron, cholesterol, protein, and fiber across quintiles of 5-A-DAY intake. There were no differences among quintiles in intake of saturated or total fat or in servings from most non-5-A-DAY food groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Latino children's intake of fruits and vegetables falls far short of current recommendations. Fruit juice accounted for a disproportionate amount of 5-A-DAY intake in this population. Sensible 5-A-DAY interventions should take into consideration the existing eating patterns of the target population.

PMID:
8179054
PMCID:
PMC1615066
DOI:
10.2105/ajph.84.5.814
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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