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Am J Public Health. 1994 Apr;84(4):599-605.

The effects of recall on estimating annual nonfatal injury rates for children and adolescents.

Author information

1
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study used a recent national population survey on childhood and adolescent non-fatal injuries to investigate the effects of recall bias on estimating annual injury rates. Strategies to adjust for recall bias are recommended.

METHODS:

The 1988 Child Health Supplement to the National Health Interview Survey collected 12-month recall information on injuries that occurred to a national sample of 17,110 children aged 0 through 17 years. Using information on timing of interviews and reported injuries, estimated annual injury rates were calculated for 12 accumulative recall periods (from 1 to 12 months).

RESULTS:

The data show significantly declining rates, from 24.4 per 100 for a 1-month recall period to 14.7 per 100 for a 12-month recall period. The largest declines were found for the 0- through 4-year-old age group and for minor injuries. Rates of injuries that caused a school loss day, a bed day, surgery, or hospitalization showed higher stability throughout recall periods.

CONCLUSIONS:

Varying recall periods have profound effects on the patterns of childhood injury epidemiology that emerge from the data. Recall periods of between 1 and 3 months are recommended for use in similar survey settings.

PMID:
8154563
PMCID:
PMC1614785
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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