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Dysphagia. 1994 Winter;9(1):7-11.

Videofluoroscopic evidence of aspiration predicts pneumonia and death but not dehydration following stroke.

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1
Cornell University Medical College, Burke Rehabilitation Center, White Plains, New York.

Abstract

In order to assess the risk of pneumonia, dehydration, and death associated with videofluoroscopic evidence of aspiration following stroke, the clinical records of 26 patients with aspiration and 33 randomly selected, case-matched, dysphagic controls without videofluoroscopic evidence of aspiration were reviewed. The videofluoroscopic modified barium swallow technique included 5 ml-thin and thick liquid barium, 5 ml barium pudding, and 1/4 cookie coated with barium, plus additional 20 and 30 ml of thin liquid barium. Patients were assessed a mean of 2 +/- 1 SD months poststroke and were followed for a mean of 16 +/- 8 SD months poststroke. The odds ratio for developing pneumonia was 7.6 times greater for those who aspirated any amount of barium irrespective of its consistency (p = 0.05). The odds ratio for developing pneumonia was 5.6 times greater for those who aspirated thickened liquids or more solid consistencies compared with those who did not aspirate, or who aspirated thin liquids only (p = 0.06). Dehydration was unrelated to the presence or absence of aspiration. The odds ratio for death was 9.2 times greater for those aspirating thickened liquids or more solid consistencies compared with those who did not aspirate or who aspirated thin liquids only (p = 0.01). Aspiration documented by modified videofluoroscopic barium swallow technique is associated with a significant increase in risk of pneumonia and death but not dehydration following stroke.

PMID:
8131429
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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